Philip K Dick’s work realised in a new anthology series

Philip K Dick who famously said that “we are living in a computer-programmed reality” is the author of around 22┬áspeculative science fiction books, many of which have made it on to the big screen in various forms.

One of the most famous adaptations was Blade Runner and its upcoming sequel, adapted from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, but many other films have used his prose as jump off points such as Minority Report, Total Recall, The Adjustment Bureau and Paycheck to name a few.

All of these films have one common denominator: they are about the effects of technology on humans and the human condition. So it is no surprise given the rise of streaming TV that someone has divised an anthology series based on his work.

The new 10-part series called Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams is produced by and starring Bryan Cranston and an impressive cast roster over the 10 episodes.

It will only be released on streaming services in America on Amazon, in the U.K. on Channel 4 and in Australia on Stan on 18 September.

With a cinematic budget that has come to be expected from premium streaming television, the series looks from the trailers to be an impressive Twilight Zone-style anthology.

As Cranston mentions in the information about the series: “I’ve always been a fan of Philip K Dicks’ writing and he has some very popular stories and we wanted to dig into the chest in the attic and find something that no one else has heard of. That is what created the desire to look deeper into his work and to find the stories that resonate. Electric Dreams is an anthology series, meaning that every episode is unrelated to the previous episode. Once each episode is over you will want to discuss it, you will want to talk more about it. We don’t want to lay out answers, our goal is to ask questions.”

The theme that runs through most of Dicks work is “what does it mean to be human?” and how do we define ourselves in a future where technology has changed.

A series designed to ask questions rather than give us answers is what Reel Dialogue is all about, so be sure and check out Philip K Dick’s Electric Dreams on 18 September.

Adrian Drayton

Adrian Drayton is the Director of Reel Dialogue. A film critic and commentator on culture for 20 years, he believes in the power of cinema and the power of God to start conversations about faith and culture. He is also a massive Star Wars nerd.